Daily Archives: July 8, 2018

Homeopathy and science

The comparison of Einstein to Hahnemann, the founder of homeopathy, is totally valid.

Hahnemann was probably the most extraordinary genius in the history of medicine, and his ideas were far ahead of his time, also in many areas outside of homeopathy, such as in the compassionate treatment of the insane. His homeopathic theory was original and revolutionary.

Homeopaths are criticised for returning to the work of a man from 200 years ago, but physicists delight in studying Einstein. Geniuses are in short supply. Fortunately there are a few working currently in homeopathy, which has enabled it to undergo great advances in the last 30 years.

The five homeopathic concepts were initially ridiculed, but subsequently all of them except one are now accepted by modern medicine, which has only caught up with two of them in the last few years.

Homeopathic principles in the 18th and 19th centuries

1. Individualised Medicine

This is a medical procedure that separates patients into specific genetic groups. Medical decisions, practices, interventions and products are then tailored to the individual patient, based on their predicted response to or risk of disease. To quote Professor Johnson, chief clinician, Cancer Research UK:

“Personalised medicine is the most exciting change in cancer treatment since chemotherapy.”

Unlike ‘conventional’ medicine from the 18th to the end of the 20th Century, Homeopathy was always about the individual. There is no such thing as a homeopathic remedy to treat chronic arthritis in a dog. Each individual dog may require a different remedy. The choice will be based on the exact objective symptoms, character, behaviour, phenotype and a detailed history. This is why homeopathy is not suited to unsophisticated double blind trials. Future conventional medicine won’t be either.

2. Serious Chronic Disease is Caused

by Mental Stress

It has been accepted for a few years in human medicine that stress is an important factor in the development of chronic disease, and recently the veterinary world is beginning to come on board.

However in 2010 the Veterinary Times published a case of osteosarcoma successfully treated using homeopathy, leading to annoyed letters being sent by some vets wondering why the character of the dog and the stresses it had experienced were relevant. One author described the possibility of homesickness causing osteosarcoma as ‘farcical’. At that time few people knew about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE). These demonstrate an association of stresses experienced as a child with health problems when an adult. This has been a notable landmark in epidemiological research, and has recently produced more than 50 scientific articles and 100 conference and workshop presentations. (3,4,5)

Crucial in the choice of remedy

Hahnemann had realised very early on in his homeopathic practice that understanding mental stress and emotional history was crucial in the choice of remedy. There are no drugs in conventional practice that take into account the physical pathology together with the mental and emotional state, which may be why this area has been poorly explored by modern medicine.

It is obvious to a vet taking a homeopathic consultation that animals are affected by specific emotional stresses, and subsequently develop disease in exactly the same way as humans. Their prescriptions reflect this. All remedies treat mental and emotional symptoms as well as physical. It is only recently that mainstream science has accepted that animals experience emotions (7). Animal emotions were never mentioned in my six years at Cambridge.-original article in full:

Geoff Johnson Vet MB MA MRCVS VetFFHom PCH

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