Sunscreen- think pure organic Coconut oil

photo by gina tylerCoconut oil Sunscreen-Reducing Chemical over the counter sunscreens (photo by gina tyler; pure organic coconut oil with rose-petals)

A side benefit of my move to avoid commercial sunscreens was that I stopped exposing my skin to toxic chemicals used in sunscreens, several of which are endocrine system disruptors, increase the risk of cancer, and more. Remember, our skin is our largest organ, and what we put on it gets absorbed into our body. Since I strive to live as naturally as possible and avoid as many toxins as I can, this was a welcome “side effect” of stopping my use of sunscreen.

It’s an ironic situation that in order to protect our skin from cancer, we started using sunscreen, but studies are now finding that using sunscreen may lead to an increased risk of cancer. This is due to a variety of reasons, including the fact that many sunscreens only block UVB rays (the good ones), and not UVA (the bad ones), creating a Vitamin D deficiency. Also, research is pointing to the fact that the Vitamin A and its derivatives that are used in many sunscreens turn toxic when exposed to the sun.

The Role of a Real Food Diet and Natural Oils as Sunscreen

No one can refute the fact that diet plays a critical role in the health of our skin. The old adage “you are what you eat” rings true. You only get out of your body what you put into it, so choose your fuel wisely. I have no doubt in my mind that my high consumption of saturated fats like coconut oil and ghee play a huge role in sun protection and the overall health of my skin. In fact, I think my diet plays one of the most important roles in my skin health and sun tolerance of anything I do. Overconsumption of polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs), like soybean, canola, and other vegetable oils, can leave our entire body, including our skin, unhealthy and at risk for a variety of health problems. When I started focusing on a whole food diet with plenty of saturated fats, I found that the health of my skin dramatically improved. I also find that I do not burn nearly as easy as I used to, even when I end up being outside a tad longer than I should have been.

Not only do I use coconut oil as my primary cooking oil, but I have also used coconut oil on my skin for years. I had heard a long time ago that coconut oil had some natural SPF properties and since I already used it for skin health, that was just an added bonus. When you start researching, many carrier oils have natural SPF. SPF stands for “Sun Protection Factor”. SPF is mainly a measure of UVB protection and ranges anywhere from 1 to 45 or more. According to Anthony J. O’Lenick, author of “Oils of Nature”, raspberry seed oil has a natural SPF of 28-50 and carrot seed oil has a natural SPF of 38-40. Other oils, like coconut oil, wheat germ oil, jojoba oil, sesame, etc. will all have lower SPF levels, ranging from 4-10. That said, none of these oils are going to give us 100% protection from UV rays (and keep in mind that they primarily block UVB rays), so you still must use common sense when using natural oils as a sunscreen.

To boost the sunscreen to more of a full-spectrum sunscreen, you can add zinc oxide to the mix. Zinc oxide is a very common ingredient in sunscreens, makeup, and other skin care products and it does help protect against both UVA and UVB rays. All that said, there is no way to really know the true SPF of this sunscreen, so always enjoy your sun time carefully. If you choose to use zinc oxide, there are a few important things to note:
1.Look for a high-quality zinc oxide that is specificly for cosmetic applications.
2.Make sure it is uncoated and not micronized or classified as a nano-particle (nano-particles can be absorbed into the bloodstream, which can create health problems).
3.It will sit on the skin, so depending on how much you use, it may leave a whitish hue.
4.Use caution when measuring and mixing it, as to not inhale the powder. Some people will use a dust mask to ensure they don’t inhale the powder.

This recipe for homemade coconut oil sunscreen uses a variety of oils and the end product is more of a body butter. It is safe for the whole family, though you want to make sure children do not ingest any of it. The beeswax will help it be slightly water-repellent. When not in use, store the mixture in the fridge to help extend the shelf-life. You can use whatever essential oils you would like for scent, but make sure to stay away from phototoxic essential oils, which includes the citrus family and a few others. When these essential oils are exposed to the sun, they can cause the skin to burn faster. If you’re not already familiar with it, the carrot seed essential oil has a natural woody, earthy scent. This is a rich body butter, so a little goes a long way. You can find all of these ingredients online or at your local health food store.

Homemade Coconut Oil Sunscreen Recipe

Ingredients

1/4 cup coconut oil

1/4 cup shea butter

1/8 cup sesame or jojoba oil

2 tbsp. beeswax granules

1-2 tbsp. zinc oxide powder (optional)

1 tsp. red raspberry seed oil

20-30 drops carrot seed essential oil

Essential oils of your choice (lavender, rosemary, vanilla, and/or peppermint are nice)

Instructions

1. Using a double boiler (or a small pan over very low heat), melt your coconut oil, sesame or jojoba oil, beeswax, and shea butter together. The beeswax will be the last to melt.

2. When the beeswax is melted, remove the mixture from the heat and let cool to room temperature. If you’re using zinc oxide, whisk it in at this point, being careful not to create a lot of dust. If there are some lumps, that’s OK. They will break up when you whip the body butter in step 4.

3. Move the mixture to the fridge for 15-30 minutes. You want it to start to set up, but still be soft enough to whip.

4. Take the mixture out of the fridge and using a stand mixer or hand mixer, start to whip it. Drizzle in the red raspberry seed oil, the carrot seed oil, and any essential oils of your choice, and continue whipping until the mixture is light and fluffy.

6. Use as you would any regular sunscreen. Application rates will depend on your activity and exposure to water. Store in a glass container in the fridge between uses.
author- Jessica Espinoza

About homeopathyginatyler

Classical Homeopath, Certified CEASE practicioner Los Angeles,Calif,USA www.ginatyler.com View all posts by homeopathyginatyler

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